Today's teens (and, admittedly, many of us) treat their smartphones like permanent appendages, texting, Facebooking, Instagramming, streaming and playing games like the outside world doesn't exist. If you're the parent of a data-hungry teen, unlimited plans can be the way to go, since they eliminate concerns about overages. Alternatively, you might consider a bare-bones "lifeline" cell phone plans that provides your teen with a means to make a calls, and not much else. 
Lease (Sprint Flex): Mo. amount excl. tax. Terms for all other customers will vary including amount due at signing & taxes/fees. Req. qualifying device & svc. plan. No equipment security deposit req. Upon completion of 18-mo. term, customer can continue to pay mo. lease amount, purch. or return device. Customer is responsible for insurance & repairs. Early termination of lease/svc.: Remaining lease pymt. will be due immed. & req. device return or pymt. of purch. option device price in lease.
More good news, at least for heavy data users, is the rise of unlimited data plans. These plans, which carriers started to pull a few years ago when smartphones such as the iPhone started using substantial amounts of data, can be a respite for a new wave of consumers hooked on streaming services such as Netflix and Spotify. All the major carriers now offer unlimited plans, but they come with catches. More on that below.
Bought this (Samsung j3 2016 international) for international travel using sim cards. Used it in Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania. Was able to register and use it in each country, though usually had an issue using the internet directly on it and instead often employed it as a hot spot for my other phone (which is not otherwise compatible for international use). It worked great as a hotspot for internet and by itself for messaging, also worked great directly when there was wifi. Im not sure if the direct internet issues were with the service I bought, or some setting i had wrong, or with this phone itself, so cannot say. But it made connectivity possible and solidly reliable by acting as a mobile hotspot and I was traveling with both phones anyway, so to me that was not much of a problem, other than having to keep them ... full review
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I LOVE this phone. I previously had an HTC Desire Eye and I loved that one so much that I was hesitant to get a new one, but it finally conked out on me. First, let me address some of the other reviews who say this phone doesn't support 4G/LTE. I'm in the US and I use T-Mobile/Metro PCS service. IT WORKS. The moment they turned on the service on this phone, the service and data worked like a charm. The service and speed are exactly the same as in my previous phone which was 4G/LTE and using the same carrier/service. The only difference is that the data indicator icon on the screen has an "H/H+" icon, but I think it's because the phone itself was programmed to work in Asia/Europe, but that's just my theory. The speed/service itself is still running on 4G/LTE. As for the performance ... full review
5G wireless—which should offer much faster and more responsive connections—is coming, but not soon. For example, Verizon and AT&T began pre-commercial 5G trials last year, but those were limited to “fixed wireless” systems that provide whole-home bandwidth. Don’t expect widespread commercial deployment of mobile 5G during the real-world lifespan of any phone you buy today. We will, however, continue watching for early signs of each carrier’s 5G rollout.

Inessa Kraft is an international traveler, iPhone SE advanced user, actress, who starred in various inspirational and travel films, videos, advertisement and TV series, including an award winning travel film Snowing Summer, besides traveling often for the shootings, she lives location independently and makes short educational films with her homeschooling kid.
Sure, vacation should be the time to power down, disconnect, and focus on the people in front of you. But that doesn't mean giving up the option of getting directions from Google Maps or documenting your exotic meal on Instagram. Using your phone abroad used to be complicated, expensive, or both, but it's getting easier and easier. Here are a few options for bringing your smartphone abroad.
Verizon’s best plan for most people is also its least obvious offering: the 5 GB for $55 deal. It’s difficult to find this plan on Verizon’s homepage, but you should see this option if you select a phone, add it to your cart, and scroll past Verizon’s flagship “unlimited” offerings when selecting a plan. (Verizon’s website quotes a $60 rate for this plan, but signing up for auto-pay using a checking account or debit card gets you $5 off—though this precludes running up points on a travel-rewards credit card).
Most major U.S. phone companies give you the option of choosing a plan that allows you to make calls, send texts and access data while traveling abroad. These plans may be offered on a daily basis or as a temporary service that you can set up for a single month when you know you’ll be leaving the country. Each company offers different plans for various prices that work for a number of phone models and in designated countries. Per-minute calling rates vary for different countries.
If you’ve tried to unlock your phone in the past but were told by your carrier that you couldn’t, you should try again. The Consumer Code for Wireless Service was implemented in February 2015, providing more freedom and flexibility to consumers when it comes to their cell phones. You can learn more about unlocking a phone or tablet from the Federal Communications Commission.
Verizon is the nation’s largest carrier for good reason: It offers the best coverage in the most places in the US according to third-party tests and surveys (including those of PCMag and RootMetrics), so you’re more likely to have a signal no matter where you are, and its pricing is competitive with that of AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile for the amount of data that most people actually use. It isn’t the best choice for people who frequently travel outside of the US or who want unlimited data, but it is the first carrier everyone else should look at.
Disclaimer: The information featured in this article is based on our best estimates of pricing, package details, contract stipulations, and service available at the time of writing. All information is subject to change. Pricing will vary based on various factors, including, but not limited to, the customer’s location, package chosen, added features and equipment, the purchaser’s credit score, etc. For the most accurate information, please ask your customer service representative. Clarify all fees and contract details before signing a contract or finalizing your purchase.
All you need to do is figure out how much data your family needs and what you’re using it for the most. It’s important to note that some carriers are now making you pay extra if you want high-definition-quality video streaming or high-speed mobile hot spot service. Some also make you buy a more expensive plan if you want overseas service included. Check our buying guide for cell phones and service for tips for choosing a plan.
When you're purchasing a cell phone, make sure the device you select has sufficient memory, speed, camera precision and general functionality to meet your needs. You can choose between locked phones, which require you to pick a carrier, such as T-Mobile, AT&T, Boost or Verizon, or you can go with an unlocked model that works on a variety of networks. Best Buy, Amazon and B&H Photo Video are just a few stores that sell unlocked phones, including Apple iPhones and Android devices. Consider a prepaid phone with limited functions if you're purchasing an inexpensive device to take with you to festivals, nightclubs and other places people frequently lose expensive cell phones.
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