The other option is an unlimited-data plan, but these aren’t truly unlimited: All four carriers have carved out restrictions on things like hotspot use and streaming video, while adding premium tiers or for-fee add-ons that lift some of those limits. As a result, shopping for wireless service can look a lot like buying a plane ticket: You can’t jump on the cheapest price you see, lest you wind up in Basic Economy.
Very pleased with this phone. Android version 4.1.2 and has not been upgraded from the manufacture, but it does run everything I want so it is acceptable. I need a dual SIM phone to separate my home/personal use from work, and this fits the bill. Internal storage is small, but I understand the cost of the phone, so I can tolerate that. I am not a gamer and only use it for calls, tasks, IM and email and some social networking. Only 3G so it is not as fast as some phones. I live in the mid-west of the United States on the T-Mobile system and reception is as good as other phones I have had. I do like this phone, small and easy to use. I would recommend this phone to others who just need a simple smart phone. I am sure ... full review

If you need better connectivity to, say, hail a Lyft from the Acropolis, simply add a global package to your current service. It's shockingly easy. For example, AT&T offers a service called Passport, which gets you 200 MB of data and unlimited texting in more than 200 countries for just $40 tacked onto your current monthly plan. (Calls abroad still cost a buck a minute, so talk quickly.) Verizon offers a similar service, Travel Pass, that costs $5 a day to extend your plan to Mexico and Canada and $10 per day for service in more than 100 other countries. How much data you need depends upon how active you plan to be online. Posting 30 photos to social media costs about 10 MB; each web page you visit costs about one. Downloading apps like Whatsapp lets you send texts and make calls without racking up minutes, and disabling "automatic refresh" on email and other apps helps avoid blowing through your data allowance.
Sprint: Sprint currently has some big discounts on Android and Apple devices, letting you get $450 back when you buy an iPhone X, iPhone 8, or iPhone 8 Plus if you add two new lines or one new line with a one-line upgrade — no trade-ins required. Sprint is also offering the best iPhone XS deal of all the carriers right now, letting you score an iPhone XS totally free or an XS Max for just $75 ($4.17 per month) with the trade-in of an eligible last-gen flagship. Android deals let you score the Samsung Galaxy S9 for $270, the Galaxy S9 Plus for $324, or the Galaxy Note 9 for $360 when you purchase one on an 18-month rent-to-own Sprint Flex lease.

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Both Verizon and Sprint have added new unlimited plans with benefits for international travel; we've updated this guide to reflect those changes. T-Mobile will increase the number of travel destinations covered by its Simple Global feature as of July 22. It also plans to add a new $5 daily data pass with 512MB of LTE data for travelers starting August 1.
What: Save $200 off a new Samsung Galaxy Note9 PLUS switch to Verizon Wireless from another carrier, trade in an eligible phone and get up to an additional $300 off. If you're already a Verizon customer, you can also get this $300 off deal by adding a new line and trading in a phone. To get this discount, you'll need to trade in an eligible phone within 30 days of buying the phone. Your $300 will be credited to your monthly bill over 24 months.
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